Reclaiming Labor History: How Domestic Workers Resisted Racism in the ’60s and ’70s

Reclaiming Labor History: How Domestic Workers Resisted Racism in the ’60s and ’70s

Author Premilla Nadasen discusses how relatively isolated Black women domestic workers organized in the 1960s and 1970s for higher wages, better labor conditions and respect and dignity in the workplace. The domestic labor movement they built offers lessons on how marginalized workers can organize today.

Participants, some carrying American flags, marching in the civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama in 1965. Many domestic worker activists got their political start in the civil rights movement. (Photo: Peter Pettus / Library of Congress)

Dismissed by mainstream white-dominated labor unions as “unorganizable,” Black American domestic workers were forced to Read More

Read more here:: http://www.truth-out.org/progressivepicks/item/33268-reclaiming-labor-history-how-domestic-workers-resisted-racism-in-the-60s-and-70s

      

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